BRITISH MILITARY UNITS IN NORTH AMERICA & SUPPORT ARMS

Introduction

There are several caveats required in reading this data below.Primarily my purpose is to show the breadth of English (and then later British) support required to nourish the colonies in North America.Since British North America (BNA) is limited by time to colonial assumption of sovereignty by a variety of legal means there are also limits to this data. British military support in BNA continued after my primary focus.

Although I have taken the War of 1812 (1812-1816) as an approximate boundary of interest I have extended that for specific unit involvements in areas of parochial concerns: the American Fenian Raids into Canada, and French/English civil unrest in Québec and the remarkable flow of troops into the Caribbean. I have chosen to use the geographical definition of North America, which includes the Caribbean and Central America. I have further broadened the foregoing definition to include South America, since the Europeans felt that America was all one. I hope to capture some of the peripheral costs of empire and the temptation of other nations to attack Britain indirectly. By including the Spanish, Americans and French in parallel descriptions I hope to enable a better understanding of context and degree of commitment.

The data below are no doubt in error of detail, but this is not intended to portray unit histories; rather this is to enable a global appreciation of colonial costs and to fit our own family members into context. Notwithstanding the foregoing, I have made every attempt for accuracy. By seeking opposing forces at this site, the reader ought to be able to compare specific opposing units for any given battle in BNA. By such an examination the reader might gain an appreciation of capability, equipment, weaponry, leadership, etc. The primary focus of interest is the 1775-1781 Revolution. The following chart (see Piers Macksey, The War for America, Harvard, 1964) is revealing.

American Revolution-Era
British Troop Dispositions: 1775-1782

Location

1775

1777

1778

1780

1782

Southern England
10,612
13,868
53,465
61,402
64,274
Northern Britain
1,745
2,116
3,282
5,651
5,872
Channel Islands
343
431
2,585
2,674
4,556
Western Mediterranean
5,232
5,351
7,081
8,008
7,371
India
0
0
1,099
1,099
1,062
Caribbean
1,983
3,315
1,751
9,290
8,756
Canada
n/a
7,767
6,647
7,471
10,225
America
6,991
23,694*
39,637
32,149
34,463
At Sea
n/a
n/a
n/a
6,194
5,872

Totals

27,063
57,637*
112,239
142,386
150,310

(*The table's 1777 figures do not include the British-hired Germans.)

The English Army

 

22nd Regiment of Foot

 

The word "regiment" was used in Henry VIII's time to describe one of the three mediaeval-type battles into which armies were still divided (in 1544, these were typically 13,000 to 16,000 strong).[1] Each of these would mass its pike men and billmen together in groups to form one to three large blocks. Commanders typically would place wings of archers on the flanks of the blocks of their central pikemen and billmen. (Cavalry would often be held in the rear to be able to deploy quickly to fill holes, or exploit an enemy's weakness. At first the troops returned home after inspection, unless an invasion threat caused them to be kept mobilized—Henry VIII kept 120,000 men on foot for a whole summer. From 1573, however, "Trained Bands" appeared, picked men from the general muster retained for drill, costs being paid by the city or county concerned. This reform was perhaps connected with the increasing use of firearms and pikes, both requiring considerable training (the bow, of course, required even more training, but this had normally been acquired by its exponents during their own time).[2]

"Regiment" still had a very vague meaning in the mid-16th Century—all the troops operating in the Netherlands, 6,000+, forming one "regiment"—but by the latter part of Elizabeth's reign, regiments had stabilised. The were fairly then definite organizations, commanded by a colonel. Regiments could then be found to have ten companies, but in Ireland were often smaller with only five. The organisational issue was (and remains) the 'span of control'. How many people can one man control in complex manoeuvers and hostile situations?[3]

English infantry companies varied with from 100 to 400 men in strength, 150 men in a company appeared to be the standard in the 1590s. Some further company-size examples are: in 1558—150 armoured pike men, 150 unarmoured pike men, 100 arquebusiers; in 1596—50 pike men, 12 musketeers, 36 caliver men; in 1599—30 pike men, ten short weapons, 30 muskets, 30 calivers; in 1600—20 pikes, ten halberds, six sword and buckler, 12 muskets with rests, 12 bastard (light) muskets, 40 calivers.

"Men-at-Arms" with heavy lance, full armour, and often barded (armoured) horse, were still used in the first half of the century, but were few in number, though of high quality. In 1544, Henry VIII had 75 "Gentlemen Pensioners" or Household cavalry, and 121 Men-at-Arms. Individual noblemen would also serve in full plate. The appearance of such troops would be much the same in any army, though Englishmen might wear rounded Greenwich armour. Much more numerous were the "demi-lances" with corselet only, or three-quarter armour, open burgonet, and unbarded horse. These men carried a lighter lance, and later pistols, and formed the main English heavy cavalry up to the end of the century.

According to Sir Roger Williams, in the late 16th Century, demi-lances formed a fifth of the English cavalry, the rest being light horse, but the proportions in the militia were nearer 1:3. The characteristic English light cavalry were those variously referred to as "Javelins" "Prickers" "Northern spears" or "Border Horse". They also were armed with lance and one pistol, sometimes carrying a round or oval shield as well, and wore an open helmet, mail shirt or jack (corselet for the wealthier individuals), leather breeches, and boots. Such cavalry were supplied by several English counties, but the best came from the raiders of the Scottish border - called reivers, who were reputed to spear salmon from the saddle! Nearly all English light horse were of this type, though by 1586 the Government were also trying to raise "petronels"—unarmoured cavalry with firearms.

The British Army

By the 1750s the army had 49 regiments, a few foot regiments of the line had two battalions, but most consisted of a single battalion with nine line companies and one grenadier company, for a typical battalion strength of about 800 officers and men.[4] By 1763 and the end of the Seven Year's War the army had expanded to 100,000 men in 125 regiments. Grenadiers survived the demise of the hand grenade and came to be regarded as the army's elite shock troops. On active service, grenadier companies were usually detached from their parent regiments and formed into composite battalions. During the Seven Years' War many regiments also raised a light infantry company, and these became a permanent part of the regimental structure in the early 1770's. Thus British infantry regiments deployed in the American Revolutionary period generally consisted of eight line companies, one grenadier company and one light infantry company.

George III had a political problem at the end of the Seven Year's War: how to deal with the national debt of £146,000,000 without causing massive unemploymennt by reducing the large army. The solution turned on a logical relationship: America had been the source of the war and it should garrison a number of regiments, as could troublesome Ireland. In 1763, the army was reduced to: 70 line regiments; three guard regiments; the specialist artillery and engineer regiments; plus the household cavalry and 21 cavalry regiments. The infantry regiments were reduced to 500 men and 20 regiments were garrisoned in the Americas (including the Caribbean). In an unsurprising show of self-interest parliament decided that the colonies could pay for their regiments. The colonial army costs included pay, upkeep, maintenance, garrisoning, and equipping.

During the American Revolution the army was expanded with an additional 36 infantry regiments and five more cavalry regiments. These new regiments were all disbanded at the end of the war - except the 23rd regiment of Dragoons, which had deployed to India in 1782 and was disbanded in 1821. The regimental manpower establishment was increased from the peacetime limit of 500 to 1,000 - although this was seldom maintained due to casualties and reinforcement difficulties. Curiously, in 1777, Lieutenant General Sir William Howe's army of 32,000 men in America included additional women. By May 1777 there were 23,101 men, 2,776 women and 1,904 children on ration strength, in addition to the Germans.[5]

In 1793, at the outbreak of the Napoleonic Wars, the British army strength had fallen and the army was badly prepared. Of 30 cavalry regiments the 19th was in India and the 20th was in Jamaica and the rest spread in Ireland and Britain. Cavalry regimental establishment was generally maintained at 285 all ranks with exceptions for the Household regiments and those overseas. Those latter units were often stronger, owing to the cachet of a 'smart regiment', or the attention to wartime duties. In 1793, the British government accepted an offer by Francis Humberston-Mackenzie (later Lord Seaforth) to raise an additional infantry battalion. As the first embodied during the Napoleonic war, this would be numbered the 78th, the original Mackenzie regiment having been re-numbered the 72nd. The new battalion had one company of grenadiers, one of light infantry, and eight line companies.

The British infantry of this period was noted for its steadiness and excellent fire discipline. The standard infantry weapon was the Brown Bess musket (officially the Long Land Pattern Musket and later in the century the Short Land Pattern Musket), perhaps the finest weapon of its type ever produced. With it, a well-trained soldier could load and fire three rounds per minute. In 1793, the Coldstream and Third Guards regiments numbered 1,184 and the First 1,845 all ranks. The 77 line regiments numbered 499 all ranks on establishment, with minor exceptions. The 36th and 52nd regiments had 1,132 men each, and the overseas units' strength varied.

The artillery was more widely spread than either the cavalry, or infantry. Nineteen foot artillery companies were in Great Britain, one company was in Scotland, five companies were in Gibraltar, eight companies were in British North America, seven companies were in the West Indies and the two independent companies were in India. Seven of the  Invalid Artillery companies were in England, one was in Scotland and two companies were in the Channel Islands. The two troops of Horse Artillery were forming in Great Britain during January and February 1793. 

Table Organisation

The following table shows English and British regiments, which deployed to BNA.[6] (I have used the geographical definition to include the wider context of the Americas.) The American Revolution (1775-1783) represented the high-point, however, there were significant numbers in the area during the Seven Years' War (1755-1763), and the War of 1812 (1812-1815). This is generally the same period as that shown for French and Spanish units. In the same vein I have shown separately British mercenary units deployed in the BNA. My extended BNA definition deliberately includes the Caribbean. Europeans planted sugarcane widely in the Caribbean (also known as the Antilles, or West Indies) and sugar became a world economic product. In 1700, each Briton used 4 pounds of sugar per year: in 1963, personal consumption had increased to 110 pounds of sugar per year. The Europeans fought with each other and the Carib natives to control the source of this wealth.

Outline regimental lineages and histories are shown, with commanders. I have reviewed the 1,000 different names and units; I have focused on those militia, volunteer, fencible, and foreign units, which were deployed into the area. (A few additional British units are shown for family reasons.) The units are organised numerically based on the 1751 seniority enumeration. This list was extended as required as regiments were deleted or added: confusingly this led to multiple regiments with the same number title, albeit at different times. (There are seven regimental titles for the 100th Regiment, some being name changes for the same unit.) I have shown major British regiments for the period, although I have not included some short-lived units. Regimental service is separated into Theatres or Wars by periods. Their dates are separated by commas and their battles are separated by semicolons within the same theatre or war. I have shown military Caribbean deployments because the British had to defend government policy and were often deliberately distracted from some primary objective to reduce British strength at the key point. (This was particularly so during the Seven Years' War and the later American Revolution.)

There is some confusion about regimental names, because of reorganisations and the early naming after commanders. I am sure of errors as various people have made interpretations and translations over the years. Perhaps the general breadth of British commitment in North America can be read from this account and that which details the forts they built. (The British were quite happy, however, to trade Canada for a French Caribbean sugar island - the French weren't.) I have abbreviated some military terms in the table for: battalion (bn); company (coy); detachment (det); and regiment (regt).

British Military Units in North America

Unit Name

Service

Cavalry

Intended permanent regiments created by the monarch and aristocracy and often named after colonels resulting in continual change and confusion. Scots, Irish, HEICS, and Continental (Dutch, German, Swiss, French, etc) regiments had to be formally accepted by English, later British, army Establishment to confirm reliability, pedigree and training details. Below are most of the British units and especially those impacting on BNA.

Horse Guards

Captain Francis George Fuller-Eliott-Drake, Alexander Mackenzie,

1661, Scots Troop of Horse Guards, 1709, 4th Troop of Horse Guards, 1746, Absorbed by 2nd Troop, 1788, 2nd Regiment of Life Guards, 1922, Amalgamated to form The Life Guards.

Did not deploy to British North America.

Royal Horse Guards Blue

c1799, Richard Hort,

1650, Regiment of Cuirassiers, 1750, Royal Horse Guards Blue, 1877, Royal Horse Guards (The Blues), 1969, Amalgamated to form The Blues and Royals (Royal Horse Guards and 1st Dragoons).

Did not deploy to British North America.

1st (The King's) Dragoon Guards

Captain Thomas Frederick Mackenzie Humberston,

1685, The Queen's Regiment of Horse, 1746, The King's Dragoon Guards, 1751, 1st (The King's) Dragoon Guards, 1921, 1st King's Dragoon Guards, 1959, Amalgamated to form 1st The Queen's Dragoon Guards.

Canada. July 1838-1843, Rebellions Occupied Upper and Lower Canada.

2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen's Bays)

Surgeon Doctor George Mackenzie,

1685, Earl of Peterborough's Regiment of Horse, 1727, The Queen's Own Regiment of Horse, 1767, 2nd Dragoon Guards (Queen's Bays), 1921, The Queen's Bays (2nd Dragoon Guards), 1959, Amalgamated to form 1st The Queen's Dragoon Guards.

Did not deploy to British North America.

3rd Regiment of Horse (Carabiniers)

Captain George Grogan,

1826, Irish to British Establishment

1685, The Queen Dowager's Regiment of Horse, 1692, The King's Regiment of Carabineers, 1756, 3rd Regiment of Horse (Carabiniers), 1826, 6th Regiment of Dragoon Guards (Carabineers), 1922, Amalgamated as 3rd/6th Dragoon Guards, 1971, The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys),

Did not deploy to British North America.

2nd (Royal North British) Regiment of Dragoons

Major Lewis Mackenzie, Captain James Mackenzie, Troop Sergeant Major Alexander Mackenzie,

1681, Royal Regiment of Scots Dragoons, 1877, 2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys), 1971, Amalgamated to form The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys).

Did not deploy to British North America.

6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers)

Lt Harold Charles Hanbury,

1788, Irish to British Establishment

1685, The Queen Dowager's Regiment of Horse, 1788, 6th Regiment of Dragoon Guards, 1922, Amalgamated to form 3rd/6th Dragoon Guards, 1971, The Royal Scots Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers and Greys).

South America. 5 July 1807, Defeated at Buenos Aires.

3rd The King's Own Hussars

1685, Duke of Somerset's Regiment of Dragoons, 1861, 3rd The King's Own Hussars; 1958, Amalgamated to form The Queen's Own Hussars, 1993, The Queen's Royal Hussars (The Queen's Own and Royal Irish).

Caribbean. 1795-1809, Occupied the Antilles during the Maroon War.

The Inniskillings (6th Dragoons)

Major Robert Warrand,

1689, Sir Albert Cunningham's Regiment of Dragoons, 1861, 6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons, 1922, Amalgamated to form 5th/6th Dragoons; 1935, 5th Royal Inniskilling Dragoon Guards; 1992, The Royal Dragoon Guards.

South America. 5 July 1807, Defeated at Buenos Aires. Canada. 1861-1863, Garrisoned Canada.

7th Queen's Own Hussars

1708, Scots to English Establishment

1689, The Queen's Own Regiment of Dragoons, 1861, 7th (The Queen's Own) Hussars, 1958, The Queen's Own Hussars, 1993, Amalgamated to form The Queen's Royal Hussars (The Queen's Own and Royal Irish).

Canada. July 1838-1843, Rebellions in Occupied Lower Canada.  

9th Queen's Royal Lancers

Lts Edward Philippe Mackenzie, Francis Henry, Gilbert Francis Henry ,

Commanders: c1868, Lieutenant Colonel James Alexander Francis Humberston Mackenzie,

1715, Owen Wynne's Regiment of Dragoons, 1921, 9th Queen's Royal Lancers, 1960, Amalgamated to form 9th/12th Royal Lancers (Prince of Wales's).

South America. 7 June 1807, Battle of San Pedro; 5 July 1807, Defeated at Buenos Aires.

11th Hussars (Prince Albert's Own)

1715, Philip Honeywood's Regiment of Dragoons, 1921, 11th Hussars (Prince Albert's Own), 1969, Amalgamated to form The Royal Hussars (Prince of Wales's Own), 1992, The King's Royal Hussars.

Caribbean. 5 February-25 March 1794, Captured Martinique; 12 April 1794, Captured Guadeloupe.

13th Hussars

1715, Richard Munden's Regiment of Dragoons, 1861, 13th Hussars, 1922, Amalgamated to form 13th/18th Hussars, 1935, 13th/18th Royal Hussars (Queen Mary's Own), 1992, The Light Dragoons.

Caribbean. 9 August-18 December 1795, Maroon War Jamaica; 1796, Battled French for control in Spanish Dominican Republic (Santo Domingo); 25 March 1796, Captured Port Royal Grenada; 1796-1803, Occupied Barbados. Fenian Raids. October 1866-July 1868, Garrisoned Upper and Lower Canada frontiers.

14th King's Hussars

1715, James Dormer's Regiment of Dragoons, 1921, 14th King's Hussars; 1922, Amalgamated to form 14th/20th Hussars, 1992, The King's Royal Hussars.

Caribbean. July-September 1795, Maroon War Jamaica; September 1795, Captured Mirebalais on Haiti (St Dominigue/Santo Domingo); September 1795-1797, Battled French for control in Spanish Dominican Republic (Santo Domingo). War of 1812. 1814-1815, Garrisoned Lower Canada.

16th The Queen's Lancers

Commander: 1776-1777, Lt Colonel William Harcourt

Cornets Roderick Grogan Mackenzie, William Howe DeLancey,

1759, 16th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1921, 16th (The Queen's) Lancers, 1922, Amalgamated to form 16th/5th Queen's Royal Lancers, 1993, The Queen's Royal Lancers.

New York, Canada, American Revolution. 28 October 1776, Defeated at Battle of White Plains; 14 December 1776, Battle of Fleming; 25 December 1776, Defeated at Battle of Trenton; 11 September 1777, Battle of Brandywine; 4 October 1777, Battle of Germantown; 7 October 1777, Defeated at Saratoga, 25 December 1778, Battle of Savannah.

17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own)

1759, 18th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1921, 17th Lancers (Duke of Cambridge's Own), 1922, Amalgamated to form 17th/21st Lancers, 1993, The Queen's Royal Lancers.

American Revolution. 17 June 1775, Battle of Bunker Hill; 27 August 1776, Battle of Brooklyn; 28 October 1776, Defeated at Battle of White Plains; 16-18 November 1776, Captured Forts Lee and Washington; 8 December 1776, Occupied Rhode Island; 3 January 1777, Battle of Princeton; 25-27 April 1777, Danbury Raid; 27 April 1777, Battle of Ridgefield; 28 April 1777, Clash at Compo Hill; 2 October 1777, Battle of Billingsport; 5-8 December 1777, Battle of Whitemarsh; 1 May 1778, Defeated Americans at Battle of Crooked Billet; 28 June 1778, Battle of Monmouth Courthouse; 2 July 1779, Pound Ridge Raid; 6 October 1777, Captured Forts Montgomery & Clinton; 12 April-9 May 1780, 2nd Siege of Charleston; 15-16 August 1780, Battle of Camden; 17 January 1781, Defeated at Battle of Cowpens; 15 March 1781, Battle of Guilford Courthouse; 28 September-19 October 1781, Battle and Surrendered at Yorktown. Caribbean. 2 April-15 October 1795-1796, Occupied Grenada in Maroon War; 18 July 1795-18 December 1795, Maroon War Jamaica; 1796-1797, Battled French for control in Spanish Dominican Republic (Santo Domingo); 25 March 1796, Captured Port Royal Grenada; 8-12 August 1796, Captured Jérémie on Haiti (St Dominigue/Santo Domingo). South America. 19 January-3 February 1807, Battle of Montevideo; 5 July 1807, Defeated at Buenos Aires.

18th Royal Hussars (Queen Mary's Own)

1759, 19th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1858, 18th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1921, 18th Royal Hussars (Queen Mary's Own), 1922, Amalgamated to form 13th/18th Hussars; 1992, The Light Dragoons.

Caribbean. 18 July 1795-18 December 1795, Maroon War Jamaica; 1795-1797, Battled French for control in Spanish Dominican Republic (Santo Domingo)

20th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons

1705, Earl of Peterborough's Regiment of Dragoons, 1760, 20th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1782, 20th (or Jamaica) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1805, 20th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1818, Disbanded.

Caribbean. 9 August-18 December 1795, Maroon War Jamaica. South America. 26 June 1806, Battle of Rio Chuelo; 27 June 1806, Captured Buenos Aires; 10-12 August 1806, Defeated at Buenos Aires; 19 January-3 February 1807, Battle of Montevideo.

21st Regiment of (Light) Dragoons

Commander: 1795-1796, Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Mackenzie,

1716, Francis Palmes's Regiment of Dragoons, 1779, 21st Regiment (Light) Dragoons,1821, Disbanded.

1795-1798, Battled French for control in Spanish Dominican Republic (Santo Domingo). South America. 19 January-3 February 1807, Battle of Montevideo.

23rd (19th) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons

1791, Lieutenant Roderick Mackenzie,

1716, Thomas Ferrers's Regiment of Dragoons, 1786, 19th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1816, 19th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons (Lancers), 1821, Disbanded.

War of 1812. 1811-1813, Garrisoned Upper and Lower Canada moving from Québec through Montréal to Kingston; 27 May 1813, Battle of Fort George; 6 June 1813, Battle of Stoney Creek; July 1813, Failed Attack on Black Rock; 18 December 1813, Battle and Captured Fort Niagara (Commandant Colonel William Claus); 28 December 1813, Captured and Burned Buffalo; 4-5 July, 1814, Battle of Chippawa; 25 July 1814, Battle of Lundy's Lane; 4 August-21 September 1814, Failed Siege of Fort Erie; 6-12 September 1814, Battle of Plattsburg; 1814-1816, Garrisoned Upper and Lower Canada.

26th (23rd) Light Dragoons

1795, Formed in West Indies

1795, 26th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1803, 23rd Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1819, Disbanded.

Caribbean. July 1795-April 1797, Battled French for control in Spanish Dominican Republic (Santo Domingo); 17-30 April 1797, Attacked Spanish at Puerto Rico; 17971798, Garrisoned Barbados.

27th (24th) Light Dragoons & 27th Lancers

1795, 27th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1803, 24th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1941, 27th Lancers, 1945, Disbanded.

Caribbean. July 1795, Battled French for control in Spanish Dominican Republic (Santo Domingo). Canada. 1807, Garrisoned Lower Canada.

28th Light Dragoons

1795, 28th (or Duke of York's Own) Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1802, Disbanded.

Caribbean. July 1795-1798, Battled French for control in Spanish Dominican Republic (Santo Domingo).

29th (25th) Light Dragoons

1795, 29th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1803, 25th Regiment of (Light) Dragoons, 1819, Disbanded.

Caribbean. July 1795-April 1797, Battled French for control in Spanish Dominican Republic (Santo Domingo).

Artillery

Formed and deployed initially as companies under a variety of names as technology was refined. In 1899, Royal Horse Artillery Royal Field Artillery and Royal Garrisoned Artillery

Royal Regiment of Artillery

Commanders (in America): 1776-1780, Major General William Phillips, Brigadier General Samuel Cleaveland, Colonel James Pattison, Lt Colonel William Phillips,

Lieutenant General John Mackenzie Macintyre, Colonels Harry Maxwell Mackenzie, Roderick Mackenzie, Lt Col Robert-Smythe Muir-Mackenzie, Major Duncan Henry Mackenzie Madras Horse Artillery, Captains Kenneth Francis Maclachlan, Charles Johnson Madras Arty, William George Johnson,

1716, Field Artillery, 1722, Royal Regiment of Artillery, 1793, also Royal Horse Artillery, 1801, Absorbed Royal Irish Artillery, 1858, Absorbed 48 batteries from the East India Company (HEICS).

1st Brigade of Artillery. 1750-1867, Many independent detachments throughout the BNA. Seven Years' War. 8 July 1758, Failed Battle for Fort Carillon/ Ticonderoga; 8 June-27 July 1758, Siege and Captured Fort Louisbourg; 25-26 July 1759, Captured Fort Carillon/Ticonderoga; 13 September 1759, Battle and Captured Québec on Plains of Abraham; 28 April 1760, Battle and Defeated at St Foy; 28 April-10 May 1760, Siege of Québec. Caribbean. 1762-1851, Grenada Caribbean. American Revolution. 1776-1783, All theatres of war and most battles. The War of 1812. 4 August-21 September 1814, Failed Siege of Fort Erie.
2nd Brigade of Artillery. American Revolution. 1776-1783, All theatres of war and most battles.
3rd Brigade of Artillery. American Revolution. 1776-1783, All theatres of war and most battles.

Engineers

Sappers and miners accompanied most armies.

Corps of Royal Engineers

Colonel Colin Mackenzie, Captains James Dundas, Victoria Cross,Lts Cecil Cholmeley Muir-Mackenzie, Alexander Mackenzie,

Corps of Royal Sappers and Miners, 1787, Corps of Royal Engineers, 1856, Amalgamated with Corps of Royal Sappers and Miners,

Many regimental detachments throughout the period 1750-1867 in BNA (and USA); 1717-1871, Corps of Military Artificers in Newfoundland; 8 June-27 July 1758, Siege and Captured Fort Louisbourg. The War of 1812. 4 August-21 September 1814, Failed Siege of Fort Erie. Canada. 1818-1871, Royal Corps of Sappers and Miners Garrisoned Newfoundand.

Marines

Royal Marine Artillery

Battery detachments.

War of 1812. 25 July 1814, Battle of Lundy's Lane; 4 August-21 September 1814, Failed Siege of Fort Erie; 6-12 September 1814, Battle of Plattsburg.
1st Bn Royal Marines War of 1812. 26 October 1813, Battle of La Colle Mills; 4 August-21 September 1814, Failed Siege of Fort Erie; 11 September 1814, Naval Battle of Lake Champlain.
2nd Bn Royal Marines,[7] American Revolution. 1775, Garrisoned Boston; 19 April-3 June 1775, Siege of Boston; 17 June 1775, Battle of Bunker Hill; 16-18 November 1776, Captured Forts Lee and Washington; 1776, Garrisoned Nova Scotia. War of 1812. 1813, Atlantic coastal raids; 6 May 1814, Battle of Oswego; 17-29 August 1814, Battle of Bladensburg and Burned Washington; 11 September 1814, Raid on Godley Wood; 12-13 September 1814, Battle of North Point; 13-15 September 1814, Battle of Fort McHenry at Baltimore.

3rd Bn Royal Marines

War of 1812. 11 September 1814, Raid on Godley Wood; 12-13 September 1814, Battle of North Point; 12-14 September 1814, Failed Battle of Fort McHenry at Baltimore.

1st Regiment Royal Marines

Lieutenant James Cumming,

1747, 44th Foot or 1st Marines to Admiralty

1739, Edward Wolfe's Regiment of Marines, 1748, Disbanded.

Caribbean. 3 January 1741, Battle of st Rupert's Bay, Dominica; January -September 1741, Occupied Jamaica; 15 March-25 April 1741, Captured Occupied and Pillaged Cartagena Colombia (Spanish New Grenada); 29 August-November 1741, Captured and Occupied Guantanamo Bay Cuba. American Revolution. 1775, Garrisoned Boston; 1776, Garrisoned Nova Scotia.
2nd Regiment Royal Marines

1747, 45th Foot or 2nd Marines to Admiralty

1739, William Robinson's Regiment of Marines, 1748, Disbanded.

Caribbean. 3 January 1741, Battle of st Rupert's Bay, Dominica; January -September 1741, Occupied Jamaica; 15 March-25 April 1741, Captured Occupied and Pillaged Cartagena Colombia (Spanish New Grenada); 29 August-November 1741, Captured and Occupied Guantanamo Bay Cuba. Canada. 13-18 September 1762, Defeated French and Captured St John's Newfoundland.

3rd Regiment Royal Marines

1747, 46th Foot or 3rd Marines to Admiralty

1739, Anthony Lowther's Regiment of Marines, 1748, Disbanded.

Caribbean. 3 January 1741, Battle of st Rupert's Bay, Dominica; January -September 1741, Occupied Jamaica; 15 March-25 April 1741, Captured Occupied and Pillaged Cartagena Colombia (Spanish New Grenada); 29 August-November 1741, Captured and Occupied Guantanamo Bay Cuba.

4th Regiment Royal Marines

1747, 47th Foot or 4th Marines to Admiralty

1739, John Wynyard's Regiment of Marines, 1748, Disbanded.

Caribbean. 3 January 1741, Battle of st Rupert's Bay, Dominica; January -September 1741, Occupied Jamaica; 15 March-25 April 1741, Captured Occupied and Pillaged Cartagena Colombia (Spanish New Grenada); 29 August-November 1741, Captured and Occupied Guantanamo Bay Cuba.
5th Regiment Royal Marines

1747, 48th Foot or 5th Marines to Admiralty

1739, Charles Douglass's Regiment of Marines, 1748, Disbanded.

Caribbean. 3 January 1741, Battle of st Rupert's Bay, Dominica; January -September 1741, Occupied Jamaica; 15 March-25 April 1741, Captured Occupied and Pillaged Cartagena Colombia (Spanish New Grenada); 29 August-November 1741, Captured and Occupied Guantanamo Bay Cuba.
6th Regiment Royal Marines

1747, 49th Foot or 6th Marines to Admiralty

Commander: 1739, Colonel Hon. Lewis Ducie Moreton

1739, Lewis Moreton's Regiment of Marines, 1748, Disbanded.

Caribbean. 3 January 1741, Battle of st Rupert's Bay, Dominica; January -September 1741, Occupied Jamaica; 15 March-25 April 1741, Captured Occupied and Pillaged Cartagena Colombia (Spanish New Grenada); 29 August-November 1741, Captured and Occupied Guantanamo Bay Cuba. Canada. 1772-1774, Garrisoned St John's Newfoundland.

ENDNOTES

1                For basic army development, organisation, and unit identifcation see Regiments http://www.regiments.org/regiments/uk/inf, http://www.napoleon-series.org/military/organization/c_britarmy1793b.html, and http://www.lib.mq.edu.au/digital/seringapatam/regiments.html#19th, and Fred Anderson, Crucible of War, Brenton C Kemmer, Redcoats, Yankees and Allies, Harv Hilowitz, Revolutionary War Chronology & Almanac 1754-1783, Michael Barthorp, The Jacobite Rebellions 1689-1745, Stuart Reid, 18th Century Highlanders, Peter Harrington, Culloden 1746 the Highland Clans' Last Charge, Robin May, Wolfe's Army, Geoffrey Wooten, Waterloo 1815 the Birth of Modern Europe, David Hackett Fischer, Washington's Crossing; and John K. Robertson and Don Hagist, Biographies of Crown Forces Generals Commanding Troop Units at, http://www.revwar75.com/crown/bio.htm, David G Chandler, The Oxford History of the British Army, at http://books.google.com/books?id=ZOgs8WpJI9AC&dq=british+army+development+and+history&pg=PP1&ots=AaE7aO1pX4&source=citation&sig=pw4kpc9V-aDrwtugOJDNsLLChok&hl=en&prev=http://www.google.com/search?q=British+Army+development+and+history&sourceid=navclient-ff&ie=UTF-8&rls=GGGL,GGGL:2006-34,GGGL:en&sa=X&oi=print&ct=result&cd=1&cad=bottom-3results; http://www.regiments.org/regiments/europe/ie-regts/690dillonh.htm.

2                George Gush, Renaissance Armies: The English—Henry VIII to Elizabeth, http://www.myarmoury.com/feature_armies_eng.html.

3                 Ibid.

4                See Regiments, at http://regiments.org for background on numbers of British regiments and their organisation in various time-frames; The First Foot Guards, at http://footguards.tripod.com/01ABOUT/01_order_o_battle.htm; Orders of Battle, British & French Regular Regiments in North America, Seven Years War, 1755-1763, at http://orbat.com/site/history/historical/uk/ukregtsusa1757.html.

5                See David Hackett Fischer, Washington's Crossing, Appendix D, pp. 383-384.

6                 Regimental history sources include: http://regiments.org/regiments/index.htm, http://orbat.com/site/index.html, http://www.albuhera.co.uk/fyop.htm, http://www.therooms.ca/museum/mnotes10.asp, http://britishbattles.com/battle-of-Louisbourg.htm, http://www.ballindalloch-press.com/55th/WestIndies.html, http://www.fifedrum.org/crfd/images/D47.htm, http://www.militaryheritage.com/Québec1.htm, http://www.historycentral.com/1812/, http://www.btinternet.com/~james.mckay/royal1st.htm, http://earlyamerica.com/review/winter96/scott.html, http://www.americanrevolution.com/SiteMap.htm, http://www.hillsdale.edu/personal/stewart/war/Abroad/1759-Québec-Town.htm, http://web.ukonline.co.uk/ewh.bryan/Cheshire-2.htm, http://www.blupete.com/Hist/Gloss/RegimentsLouisbourg1758.htm, http://www.reenact.com/bghistory.html, http://www.americanrevolution.com/WilliamHowe.htm, http://www.warof1812.ca/lang.htm, For regiments in the Seven Years' War see http://www.warof1812.ca/charts/7warchtf.htm, the Seven Years' War Website, http://www.britishempire.co.uk/forces/armyunits/britishcavalry/17thltdragoons1759.htm, http://www.lightinfantry.org.uk/regiments/Canada/can_infantry.htm, http://www.revwar75.com/crown/index.htm, http://www.army.mod.uk/ddli/history_/index.htm, http://www.army.mod.uk/royalscots/, http://www.townshipsheritage.com/Eng/Hist/Military/rangers.htmlhttp://www.napoleonicminiatureswargame.com/Chippawa.html, http://www.napoleonguide.com/windies.htm, http://www.queensroyalsurreys.org.uk/1661to1966/martinique/martinique.html, http://www.theamericanrevolution.org/prerev.asp, http://www.electricscotland.com/history/scotreg/macleod/1777.htm, http://www.graham.day.dsl.pipex.com/na64.htm, http://orbat.com/site/history/index.html, http://www.royalfuzileers.com/regiment.html, http://www.nps.gov/cowp/Timeline.htm, http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/books/amh/AMH-06.htm, http://www.replications.com/17LD/17hist.htm, http://www.thewardrobe.org.uk/regimental_timeline.php?regiment=none&start_year=1744&end_year=1870&offset=0&submit2=submit&pag_offset=0, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_British_Forces_in_the_American_Revolutionary_War, http://37.1911encyclopedia.org/S/ST/ST_LUCIA.htm, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/%7Ecrossroads/regiments/regiments-infantry.html, http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/%7Ecrossroads/regiments/, http://www.blupete.com/Hist/Gloss/RegimentsLouisbourg1758.htm, http://www.electricscotland.com/history/scotreg/argyle.htm, http://www.sar.org/ohssar/revolutionary_war_alphabetical_listhtm, http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/collections/continental/timelin2.html, http://www3.sympatico.ca/dis.general/40th.htm, http://library.thinkquest.org/22916/ex1813.html, http://www.ordersofbattle.darkscape.net/site/warpath/regts/dcli.htm, http://www.royalprovincial.com/history/battles/larrep1.shtml, http://www.ixregiment.org.uk/earhist2.htm, http://www.napoleonicminiatureswargame.com/lundyslaneob.html, http://www.napoleonicminiatureswargame.com/chippawaob.html, http://www.militaryheritage.com/charts/7warchtb.htm, http://www.revwar75.com/crown/index.htm, http://www.lightinfantry.org.uk/regiments/obli/ox_43rdfoottl.htm, http://www.army.mod.uk/qlr/history.htm, http://64.233.179.104/search?q=cache:amf_lmuPaAgJ:www.fifedrum.org/crfd/images/D15F.htm+15th+foot&hl=en&gl=us&ct=clnk&cd=2, http://olivetreegenealogy.com/loy/muster/15reg.shtml, http://44thregiment.itgo.com/history.html, http://lareine.homestead.com/history.html, http://www.lightinfantry.org.uk/regiments/ksli/shrop_53foottl.htm, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Thousand_Islands, http://www.fort-ticonderoga.org/history/bibliographies/1759Campaign.htm, http://www.militaryheritage.com/charts/7warchtf.htm, http://www.gutenberg.org/files/16724/16724-h/16724-h.htm, http://www.phmc.state.pa.us/ppet/bushyrun/page1.asp?secid=31, http://www.patriotresource.com/battles/Québec/page1.html, http://www.nyhistory.net/~drums/kingsmen.htm; and Stuart Reid British Redcoat, 1740-93.

7                 Harv Hilowitz, Revolutionary War Chronology & Almanac, 1754-1783, estimates that during the American Revolution 1776-1781.  an additional 50,000 sailors and marines from the British Caribbean and Atlantic fleets were used to support the army.

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